Jordan's King Abdullah II pays a hospital visit to people injured in Monday's shooting at a police training center. Yousef Allan/Jordanian royal palace via EPA/Landov hide caption

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Yousef Allan/Jordanian royal palace via EPA/Landov

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

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Lina Ejeilat helped found the Jordanian online magazine 7iber (pronounced 'Hebber'). While the government encourages free expression in principle, many strict regulations remain, as noted by the satirical chart next to her. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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Art Silverman/NPR

Jordan's Fuzzy Definition Of Free Speech

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Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Jordan's King Balances Threats Abroad And Critics At Home

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Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov

Jordan's Army Preps For A Bigger Role Against ISIS

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Demonstrators chant anti-Islamic State group slogans and carry posters with pictures of Jordanian King Abdullah II, late King Hussein and slain Jordanian pilot, Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, during a rally in Amman, Jordan. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Nasser Nasser/AP

Mourners pray during a ceremony for Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was killed by the Islamic State after he was captured in December. At Wednesday's service, which took place in the city of Karak, mourners called for the destruction of ISIS. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty

As Jets Roar Overhead, Jordan Remembers Its Fallen Pilot

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Saif al-Kaseasbeh (dressed in black), father of Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh, sits with senior officers of Jordan's military Wednesday at the headquarters of his family's clan in the city of Karak. Kaseasbeh is calling for revenge against ISIS for killing his son. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Supporters of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh hold posters of him that read, "We are all Muath," during a protest in Amman, Jordan, on Tuesday. Raad Adayleh/AP hide caption

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Raad Adayleh/AP

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest in front of royal palace in Amman, Jordan, Tuesday. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. JAMAL NASRALLAH/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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JAMAL NASRALLAH/EPA /LANDOV

Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

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Lebanese clown Sabine Choucair, a member of "Clowns Without Borders," performs for children in June at a Syrian refugee camp in the eastern town of Chtoura, Lebanon. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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A photo released by the U.S. Navy shows the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea launching a Tomahawk cruise missile against Islamic State targets in Syria on Tuesday. Eric Garst/U.S. Navy/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Eric Garst/U.S. Navy/EPA/Landov