Ginger, an English bulldog, stands watch while at work with her owner, Will Pisnieski, at Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif., in 2012. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 7 percent of employers allow pets at work. Grant Hindsley/AP hide caption

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Who Let The Dogs In? More Companies Welcome Pets At Work

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Diabetes alert dogs are trained to detect low blood glucose in a person. The dogs can cost $20,000, but little research has been done on their effectiveness. Frank Wisneski/Flickr hide caption

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An image from a CHP video shows a Chihuahua leading officers on a chase across the Bay Bridge. California Highway Patrol/Screen shot by NPR hide caption

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Shelter dog Rohan takes a break from his scent detection trials to play outside. Rohan is one of several dogs training to detect homemade bombs at the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University. Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ hide caption

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Dogs' New Challenge: Find A Bomb Before It Becomes A Bomb

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Cheryl Woolnough, director of training at Patriot PAWS in Rockwall, Texas, works with Papi, a Labrador retriever. Lauren Silverman/KERA News hide caption

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Veterans Say Trained Dogs Help With PTSD, But The VA Won't Pay

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The puppies in this litter are the first ever born through IVF Mike Carroll/Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine hide caption

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Tang Xiong Xiong, a Bichon Frise, came into the salon as a ball of fluff and emerged with her head shaped like a square. "She's getting used to it," says her owner. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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For Taiwanese Dogs, Being Square Is Stylish

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A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

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Ken (left) and Henry were created using DNA plucked from a skin cell of Melvin, the beloved pet of Paula and Phillip Dupont of Lafayette, La. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Cloning Your Dog, For A Mere $100,000

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Rex, a retired K-9 dog, is in the custody of Animal Services as officials in Albuquerque, N.M., decide what to do with him. Albuquerque Police Department hide caption

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Lily chases sheep for the first time in her shepherd-mix life, at Raspberry Ridge Sheep Farm in eastern Pennsylvania. Several times a year the farm invites dogs for "herding instinct tests." Fred Mogul/WNYC hide caption

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Do City Dogs Dream Of Chasing Country Sheep?

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Hard to resist. But if they're marijuana edibles, not such a treat. James A. Guilliam/Getty Images hide caption

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When Pets Do Pot: A High That's Not So Mighty

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Dinaz Campbell, 10, holds Sherry, her newly adopted dog, at an adoption clinic in Rockville, Md. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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For Many Adopted Dogs, The Journey Home Takes A Thousand Miles

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Researchers discovered ancient animal mummies piled up in heaps inside a catacomb. Many of the mummies were in poor condition. Courtesy of Paul Nicholson hide caption

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Millions Of Mummified Dogs Found In Ancient Egyptian Catacombs

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