About 1.4 million Fiat Chrysler vehicles, including Dodges, Jeeps, Rams and Chryslers, were recalled on Friday over concerns that they could be remotely hacked. On Sunday, federal regulators announced previous Fiat Chrysler safety recalls had been mishandled and hit the company with a record $105 million fine. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fiat Chrysler Hit With Record $105 Million Fine Over Safety Recalls

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After initially recalling products made at its Oklahoma facility, Blue Bell is now asking retailers and customers to throw away or return all of its products currently on the market. Blue Bell hide caption

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Blue Bell

The 2002 Honda CR-V is one of dozens of car models subject to a recall for faulty air bags. The air bag manufacturer, Takata, supplies bags for more than 30 percent of all cars and is one of only three large air bag suppliers. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/AP hide caption

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Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/AP

No Quick Fixes For Drivers Affected By Air Bag Recall

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Executive vice president and general counsel at General Motors Co. Michael Millikin (from left), GM CEO Mary Barra, CEO and president of Delphi Automotive PLC Rodney O'Neal and chairman of the firm at Jenner & Block Anton Valukas testify before a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov

GM has released details about its compensation fund for victims of a fatal safety flaw in its ignition switches. The Chevrolet Cobalt is one of several GM models that were recalled over the flaw. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

General Motors Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra (center), Executive Vice President Mark Reuss (right) and President Dan Ammann discuss a review of the company's handling of a recall for a deadly ignition switch problem. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

The Chevrolet Cobalt is one of several GM models that were recalled for faulty ignition switches. The carmaker is paying a $35 million penalty. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

GM Will Pay $35 Million Fine Over Massive Safety Recall

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As members of Congress prepared to hear testimony from GM's CEO Tuesday, Ken and Jayne Rimer, whose daughter, Natasha Weigel, died in the crash of a 2005 Chevy Cobalt, spoke at a news conference held by family members of deceased drivers. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images