Homo sapiens Homo sapiens

Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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Martin Meissner/AP

Were Neanderthals Religious?

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Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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An ancient stone tool unearthed at the excavation site near Kenya's Lake Turkana. It's not just the shape and sharp edges that suggest it was deliberately crafted, the researchers say, but also the dozens of stone flakes next to it that were part of the same kit. MPK-WTAP hide caption

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MPK-WTAP

Chipping Away At The Mystery Of The Oldest Tools Ever Found

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Our popular image of Homo erectus as the proto-guy who whose human-like traits all emerged at once needs overhauling, some anthropologists say. Sylvain Entressangle/Science Source hide caption

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Sylvain Entressangle/Science Source

Dance Of Human Evolution Was Herky-Jerky, Fossils Suggest

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Blaine Badick walks through floodwaters with her dogs in Hoboken, N.J., on Wednesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A piece of red ochre with a deliberately engraved design is pictured here at Cape Town's Iziko/South African Museum in 2002. The piece was discovered in Blombos Cave near Stilbaai, about 300 kilometers from Cape Town. Anna Ziemenski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Ziemenski/AFP/Getty Images