Neanderthals, represented here by a museum's reconstruction, had been living in Eurasia for 200,000 years when Homo sapiens first passed through, and the communities intermingled. The same genes that today play a role in allergies very likely fostered a quick response to local bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, scientists say. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Itchy Eyes? Sneezing? Maybe Blame That Allergy On Neanderthals
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A mother and daughter herd their yaks along a highway on the Tibetan plateau. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Help From Extinct Humans, Tibetans Adapted To High Altitude
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