Cookie dough clings to the beaters of a standing mixer. The Food and Drug Administration is warning people not to eat raw dough due to an ongoing outbreak of illnesses linked to flour tainted with E. coli. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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A Chipotle restaurant at Union Station in Washington, D.C. The company's food-safety troubles have provoked quite a bit of schadenfreude in the rest of the food industry. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Chipotle's Food-Safety Woes? Don't Expect Sympathy From Rest Of Industry

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A passerby walks past a Chipotle restaurant in Seattle in November that closed following one of two E.coli outbreaks that sickened scores of people. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Chipotle Faces A Criminal Investigation Into Its Handling Of A Norovirus Outbreak

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Chipotle Mexican Grill founder and CEO Steve Ells, shown here in an interview with The Associated Press last month, says the company intends to become a leader in food safety. Stephen Brashear/AP hide caption

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After Chipotle Outbreaks, Will 'Food With Integrity' Still Resonate?

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Ayesha Mumtaz inspects food during a raid on a backyard sweets factory in Lahore, Pakistan. Her campaign to clean up the kitchens and food factories of Pakistan has earned her the nickname "The Fearless One." Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Lahore's Food Safety Czar Declares 'War' On Unhygienic Food

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A woman washes dishes on the street in Hanoi, Vietnam. The World Health Organization says the burden of foodborne disease in Southeast Asia is one of the highest in the world. Luong Thai Linh/EPA/Landov hide caption

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A Chipotle Mexican Grill was closed in Boston on Tuesday. According to a Boston College spokesman, 120 students have gotten sick after eating at the fast-food chain. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Chipotle Faces Another Foodborne Illness Outbreak, This Time In Boston

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Lettuce grows in a field in Gonzales, Calif. The Food and Drug Administration has released new food safety rules that cover farmers who grow fresh produce, as well as food importers. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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The vast majority of reported cases of norovirus — the leading cause of foodborne disease outbreaks and illnesses across the country — have been linked to infected food industry workers. iStockphoto hide caption

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