food allergies food allergies

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital say shellfish is the most common food allergen to afflict Americans. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images
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If Raw Fruits Or Veggies Give You A Tingly Mouth, It's A Real Syndrome

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The National Institutes of Health has announced new guidelines for when parents should begin introducing peanut-containing foods into the diets of infants at risk for food allergies. Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr hide caption

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Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr

Despite assumptions that peanut, egg and other allergies are becoming more common in the U.S., experts say they just don't know. One challenge: Symptoms can be misinterpreted and diagnosis isn't easy. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images

Are Food Allergies On The Rise? Experts Say They Don't Know

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Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors say, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can help prevent peanut allergies. Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Hey, Baby, Meet Peanuts: How And When To Safely Introduce The Food

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A second big study affirms new thinking: Exposing high-risk kids to peanuts beginning in infancy greatly reduces the chance of developing a peanut allergy. And this peanut tolerance holds up as kids get older. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Peanut Mush In Infancy Cuts Allergy Risk. New Study Adds To Evidence

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In a landmark new study, researchers found that babies who consumed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting when they were between 4 and 11 months old, were about 80 percent less likely to develop a peanut allergy by age 5. To avoid a choking hazard, doctors say kids should be fed peanuts mixed in other foods, not peanuts or globs of peanut butter. Anna/Flickr hide caption

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Anna/Flickr

Feeding Babies Foods With Peanuts Appears To Prevent Allergies

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SafetyTat, the inventor of children's safety tattoos, offers a line of allergy tattoos to help children with food allergies. Courtesy of SafetyTat hide caption

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Courtesy of SafetyTat

Researchers are learning more about how to treat milk allergy by giving kids a small amount of milk protein, but it needs further study. MICHAEL PROBST/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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MICHAEL PROBST/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A recent settlement between a university and the Justice Department may encourage institutions to better accommodate students with food allergies. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

The iTube platform, left, uses colorimetric assays and a smartphone-based digital reader to detect potential food allergen. A screen capture of the iTube App appears on the right. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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To Sniff Out Childhood Allergies, Researchers Head To The Farm

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