Why did a deliberately bad study showing the weight-loss benefits of chocolate get picked up by many news outlets? Science journalist John Bohannon — the man behind the study — says reporting on junk nutrition studies happens all the time. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Rows of potted cocoa plants from around the world. Before a cocoa variety from one country can be planted in another, it first makes a pit stop here, at a quarantine center in rural England. Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond

For Valentine's Day, Helen Jo, the pastry chef at Little Bird Bistro in Portland, Ore., mixes white chocolate with crunchy cereal, spicy pepper and a pinch of salt to make a French bonbon called rocher. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deena Prichep for NPR

A box of five Cadbury Creme Eggs in London. The confectioner's decision to change the chocolate used to make the outer shell has left many in the U.K. in "shellshock." Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov

Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Maman Pye cacao, a Haitian supertree, can produce 20 times as many cacao pods as ordinary trees, and the pods themselves are denser with cacao seeds than ordinary pods. Shutterstock hide caption

itoggle caption Shutterstock

Researchers say the polyphenols in dark chocolate can help the body form more nitric oxide, a compound that causes blood vessels to dilate and blood to flow more easily. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Vincent Mourou, co-founder of Vietnam's first artisan chocolate maker Marou, inspects cacao beans at a farmer's garden in Go Cong Tay district. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

A mathematician's sweet dream: For about $10,000, you can print out rainbow sugar dodecahedrons and interlocking cubes. 3D Systems hide caption

itoggle caption 3D Systems

Ready for a blowout: Blasting the duck with the dryer before roasting dehydrates the flesh so the skin gets firm and crispy. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

Breakfast of chocolate at Tiffany's? Ten pounds of the dark, sweet stuff were used to craft this Audrey Hepburn-inspired dress and matching handbag, created by master chocolatier Mark Tilling of Squires Kitchen. Photo: Paul Winch-Furness/Courtesy of Salon du Chocolat hide caption

itoggle caption Photo: Paul Winch-Furness/Courtesy of Salon du Chocolat

Would he have won a James Beard? The First Earl of Sandwich probably brought the iced chocolate drink to England from Spain, decades before the recipe appeared in cookbooks. Jan Arkesteijn/Wikimedia.org hide caption

itoggle caption Jan Arkesteijn/Wikimedia.org