New York City restaurant Serendipity 3 makes the "Quintessential Grilled Cheese Sandwich," made with gold leaf, accompanied by the gold-adorned South African Lobster & San Marzano Tomato Bisque, for sandwich-dipping, of course. Courtesy of Liz Steger hide caption

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Courtesy of Liz Steger

People walk past the entrance of the parking garage where reporter Bob Woodward held late night meetings with Deep Throat, his Watergate source who later turned out to be Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 official. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Thousands Of Toys Wash Ashore On German Island

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Researchers are recruiting volunteers to participate in a four-year study trial of cocoa extract. Half of the participants will take capsules containing about as much cocoa extract as you'd get from eating about 1,000 calories of dark chocolate. Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images hide caption

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Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images

A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

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A blogger recently accused Mast Brothers of using industrial chocolate in their bars when it first started, contradicting the chocolate company's bean-to-bar narrative. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

As Big Food Feels Threat Of Climate Change, Companies Speak Up

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A piece of cacao cut open to reveal its fruit. The seeds, in particular, hidden at the center of the fruit, are a key ingredient in chocolate production. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

For 3-D food printers, chocolate is a good material to start with, because it's fairly simple to make it liquid inside the printer cartridge and solid once it drops out. Courtesy of Smart Gastronomy Lab, University of Liège hide caption

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Courtesy of Smart Gastronomy Lab, University of Liège

There's a growing body of evidence suggesting that compounds found in cocoa beans, called polyphenols, may help protect against heart disease. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

Chocolate, Chocolate, It's Good For Your Heart, Study Finds

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Why did a deliberately bad study showing the weight-loss benefits of chocolate get picked up by many news outlets? Science journalist John Bohannon — the man behind the study — says reporting on junk nutrition studies happens all the time. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Trickster Journalist Explains Why He Duped The Media On Chocolate Study

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Rows of potted cocoa plants from around the world. Before a cocoa variety from one country can be planted in another, it first makes a pit stop here, at a quarantine center in rural England. Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond

The Fate Of The World's Chocolate Depends On This Spot In Rural England

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For Valentine's Day, Helen Jo, the pastry chef at Little Bird Bistro in Portland, Ore., mixes white chocolate with crunchy cereal, spicy pepper and a pinch of salt to make a French bonbon called rocher. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

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Deena Prichep for NPR

The Other Chocolate Tries For Sweet Redemption

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A box of five Cadbury Creme Eggs in London. The confectioner's decision to change the chocolate used to make the outer shell has left many in the U.K. in "shellshock." Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

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Anthony Devlin/PA Photos/Landov

Tweaks To Cadbury Creme Eggs Not Going Over Easy In The U.K.

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