A limestone slab engraved with an image of an aurochs, or extinct wild cow, discovered at Abri Blanchard in 2012. Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire hide caption

toggle caption
Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family before formally signing his cabinet nominations into law on Jan. 20 in the President's Room of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are, Vice President Mike Pence, the president's wife Melania Trump, their son Barron Trump, and House Speaker Paul Ryan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What did she say? Eniko Kubinyi/Science hide caption

toggle caption
Eniko Kubinyi/Science

Their Masters' Voices: Dogs Understand Tone And Meaning Of Words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491935800/491984312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Among the hominin fossils found at the Mata Menge site on the Indonesian island of Flores was part of a lower jaw. Kinez Riza/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
Kinez Riza/Nature

Fossils Suggest That Island Life Shrank Our 'Hobbit' Relatives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481263190/481351365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Female Drosophila bifurca flies have an organ to store sperm (right) that male flies compete to fill, crowding out rivals. Scott Pitnick/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Pitnick/Nature

For Female Fruit Flies, Mr. Right Has The Biggest Sperm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479183334/479502076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The harmless mite Demodex folliculorum, seen here in an electron microscope image, lives in the follicles of eyelashes. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Syred/Science Source

Can you guess which eyes belong to what animal? Top row, from left: cuttlefish, lion, goat. Bottom row, from left: domestic cat, horse, gecko. Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr

Eye Shapes Of The Animal World Hint At Differences In Our Lifestyles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430149677/431807532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript