evolution evolution

Surprise! Not one of these things contains a single speck of blue pigment. Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog/Look Into My Eyes/Flickr hide caption

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Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog/Look Into My Eyes/Flickr

How Animals Hacked The Rainbow And Got Stumped On Blue

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Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus — one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment. A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson/McGill University hide caption

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A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson/McGill University

"Better Together" will illustrate a story about bird personalities and cooperation when the book Great Adaptations is published in the fall. James Munro/Courtesy of Breadpig, Inc. hide caption

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James Munro/Courtesy of Breadpig, Inc.