The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says that it is now raising all of its chickens without routine antibiotics. Only those flocks that get sick, about 5 percent of all birds, will be treated. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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A Pennsylvania woman developed a urinary tract infection cased by Escherichia coli bacteria that were found to be resistant to colistin, an antibiotic that is seen as the last line of defense. Nature's Geometry/Science Source hide caption

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Nature's Geometry/Science Source

Syphilis can be wiped out with one to three shots of penicillin. PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images

Penicillin Shortage Could Be A Problem For People With Syphilis

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At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio