A Pennsylvania woman developed a urinary tract infection cased by Escherichia coli bacteria that were found to be resistant to colistin, an antibiotic that is seen as the last line of defense. Nature's Geometry/Science Source hide caption

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Syphilis can be wiped out with one to three shots of penicillin. PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images hide caption

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Penicillin Shortage Could Be A Problem For People With Syphilis

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At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Cattle graze in a field near Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown, along with many health advocacy groups, has called the overuse of antibiotics "an urgent public health problem." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

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To Avoid Intestinal Distress While Traveling Overseas, Skip The Ceviche

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Patients receive treatment at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, India. The country has one of the highest rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the world, in part because antibiotics for the disease are poorly regulated by the government. Dar Yasin/AP hide caption

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As Antibiotic Resistance Spreads, WHO Plans Strategy To Fight It

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Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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