These mitochondria, in red, are from the heart muscle cell of a rat. Mitochondria have been described as "the powerhouses of the cell" because they generate most of a cell's supply of chemical energy. But at least one type of complex cell doesn't need 'em, it turns out. Science Source hide caption

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A colored enhanced scanning electron micrograph of Burkholderia pseudomallei. These motile bacteria are the cause of melioidosis, a tropical disease spread through contaminated water and soil. The bacteria can infect the skin, causing inflammation and muscle aches, or the lungs, causing chest pain, cough and in some cases pneumonia. Eye of Science hide caption

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Wherever You Go, Your Personal Cloud Of Microbes Follows

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To Avoid Intestinal Distress While Traveling Overseas, Skip The Ceviche

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Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea. R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway hide caption

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Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

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Biologist Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project, recently moved the project to the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado hide caption

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A French cheesemaker sets up wheels of Reblochon, a semi-soft cheese made from raw cow's milk, for maturing in a farm in the French Alps. Anglophone cheesemakers say translating a French government cheese manual will help them make safer raw milk cheese. Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers. Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery hide caption

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Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

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