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Wherever You Go, Your Personal Cloud Of Microbes Follows

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To Avoid Intestinal Distress While Traveling Overseas, Skip The Ceviche

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Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea. R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway hide caption

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R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

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Biologist Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project, recently moved the project to the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado hide caption

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Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado

A French cheesemaker sets up wheels of Reblochon, a semi-soft cheese made from raw cow's milk, for maturing in a farm in the French Alps. Anglophone cheesemakers say translating a French government cheese manual will help them make safer raw milk cheese. Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers. Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery hide caption

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Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

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Current water-filtering technology is costly, but MIT scientists are testing a simpler and cheaper method that uses wood from white pine trees. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Wikimedia Commons

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

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Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School. Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin
Illustration by Benjamin Arthur for NPR

Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

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