Tunisian soldiers patrol the outskirts of Ben Guerdane, in southern Tunisia, on March 8. Islamic State extremists crossed over from nearby Libya on March 7. They were beaten back, but the episode raised concerns that Libya's chaos could spread to Tunisia. AP hide caption

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Tunisia's Fragile Democracy Faces A Threat From Chaotic Libya

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Delegates from the Libyan political dialogue participants raise their hands at the signing ceremony of the Libyan Political Agreement in Skhirat, Morocco, on Friday. Zhang Yuan/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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An excerpt from The Arab of the Future about growing up in Libya in the 1980s, where housing was free. But another family moved into the author's home while he and his family were away. Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co. hide caption

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Syrian Author Finds 'The Arab Of The Future' In His Own Past

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum on health care at Moulton Elementary School in Des Moines, Iowa, on Tuesday. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Mohammed Ali Malek is seen at Catania's tribunal, on Friday. Italian prosecutors blamed the captain of a grossly overloaded fishing boat for a collision that capsized and sank his vessel off Libya, drowning hundreds of migrants. Antonio Parrinello/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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In this photo made available Thursday, April 23, 2015, migrants crowd and inflatable dinghy as the Italian Coast Guard approaches them, off the Libyan coast, on Wednesday. Alessandro Di Meo/AP hide caption

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Hamudeh al-Masaadi plays on the shores of Lake Constance near Friedrichshafen, where they wait as their request for asylum is processed. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Personnel at work in the operations room of the Italian coast guard in Rome on Sunday during the coordination of relief efforts after a ship carrying hundreds of migrants capsizes off Libyan coast occurred in the Strait of Sicily. Angelo Carconi /Landov hide caption

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Relatives of Egyptian Coptic Christians purportedly murdered in Libya by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants mourn for those killed. Mohamed el-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ISIS Beheadings In Libya Devastate An Egyptian Village

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Libya's oil terminals — like the Brega refinery and oil terminal, pictured in March 11, 2014 — are being fought over by militias and by the nation's two rival governments. The conflict is drying up production, and may have a devastating impact on the nation's battered economy. Abdullah Doma/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Oil Fields Under Attack, Libya's Economic Future Looks Bleak

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Migrants who survived a shipwreck are escorted as they arrive at the Lampedusa harbor on Wednesday. Some 300 others drowned in the latest such disaster triggered by people fleeing conflicts in North Africa. Antonio Parrinello/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Libyan Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni arrives for a dinner hosted by President Obama last August in Washington. Thinni heads Libya's internationally recognized government, but due to the fighting among rival factions, he is operating from the eastern city of Bayda, hundreds of miles east of the capital, Tripoli. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Libya Today: 2 Governments, Many Militias, Infinite Chaos

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