The Pentagon says many of the ISIS fighters targeted in Wednesday's strike escaped from the former ISIS stronghold of Sirte, shown here during fighting in September. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

An Afriqiyah Airways plane from Libya sits on the tarmac in Malta on Friday. Malta's state television said two hijackers who diverted a Libyan commercial plane to the Mediterranean island nation had threatened to blow it up. Jonathan Borg/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Borg/AP

President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in Charlotte, N.C., on July 26. Trump has no military experience, but will become commander in chief at a time when the U.S. is bombing targets in four separate wars. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

People struggle in the water during a rescue operation of a rescue ship run by Maltese NGO Moas and the Italian Red Cross off the Libyan coast. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers take up a position during a patrol in Baghdad in 2007. The U.S. has been waging war nonstop for 15 years since the Sept. 11 attacks. Despite the protracted conflicts and disappointing results, U.S. involvement in multiple wars appears set to continue for years to come. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A photo from 2011 shows buildings ravaged by fighting in Sirte, Libya. Islamic State militants have controlled the city since August 2015. The U.S. military has announced ongoing airstrikes against targets in Sirte. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

Libyans are wary, but are enjoying a bit of normalcy at the new cafes that have sprung up in the past few months. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images

In The Midst Of Libya's Turmoil, New Cafes Spring Up To 'Change The Mood'

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Men carry a coffin during the arrival of migrants and refugees in the port of Messina following a rescue operation at sea by the Italian Coast Guard ship "Diciotti" on March 17 in Sicily. After several quiet weeks, March saw a pickup in the flow of migrants attempting to reach Italy via Libya, a route through which about 330,000 people have made it to Europe since the start of 2014. Giovanni Isolino/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Giovanni Isolino/AFP/Getty Images

Tunisian soldiers patrol the outskirts of Ben Guerdane, in southern Tunisia, on March 8. Islamic State extremists crossed over from nearby Libya on March 7. They were beaten back, but the episode raised concerns that Libya's chaos could spread to Tunisia. AP hide caption

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AP

Tunisia's Fragile Democracy Faces A Threat From Chaotic Libya

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