Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a press conference Wednesday prior to a town hall meeting at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, N.H. Matthew Healey/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Will GOP's Efforts To Reach Out To Hispanics Survive These Primaries?
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A supporter waves a Cuban flag in front of the country's embassy after it reopened for the first time in 54 years on July 20 in Washington, D.C. The embassy was closed in 1961 when U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower severed diplomatic ties with the island nation after Fidel Castro took power in a communist revolution. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, hosted by the Centennial Institute, Colorado Christian University's think tank, in Denver, last month. Walker is announcing a run for the White House, joining more than a dozen Republicans to enter the 2016 contest. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Protesters close their eyes in silent prayer as they stand on the South Carolina Statehouse steps during a rally to take down the Confederate flag, Saturday, June 20, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. Rainier Ehrhardt/Associated Press hide caption

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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is one of four "un-candidates" being targeted by liberal groups Campaign Legal Center and Democracy 21. They say the politicians have crossed the line into candidacy based on their activities in recent months. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Hundreds of union members rally outside the Capitol in Madison on Tuesday to oppose a Republican-led measure that would make Wisconsin a right-to-work state. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gov. Scott Walker Goes Head-To-Head With Labor Over Right-To-Work
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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker spoke about taking on public employee unions, and the protests that followed, at a recent candidates forum in Iowa. He said what people may not know is that protesters — as many as 1,000 of them — showed up outside his home while his family was there. He says he also received death threats. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Gov. Scott Walker Eyes 2016, But Can He Get Past Labor's Loathing?
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Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker speaks in Milwaukee in May. Newly released documents show prosecutors are alleging Walker was at the center of a nationwide "criminal scheme" to illegally coordinate with outside conservative groups. Jeffrey Phelps/AP hide caption

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