Large cracks in the sidewalk in Coyle, Okla., appeared after several earthquakes on Jan. 24. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Geology Maps Reveal Areas Vulnerable To Man-Made Quakes
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Rescue workers used heavy equipment to look for survivors trapped in a building that collapsed in a magnitude-6.4 earthquake in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes
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Gary Matli, a field supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, inspects a disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Faced With Spate Of Tremors, Oklahoma Looks To Shake Up Its Oil Regulations
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Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Carla Gugino star in the action thriller San Andreas. Jasin Boland /Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Fact-Checking 'San Andreas': Are Earthquake Swarms For Real?
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A woman in Kathmandu walks past rubble following several massive earthquakes in Nepal. Officials say at least 76 people died in Tuesday's magnitude-7.3 quake. Jonas Gratzer/Getty Images hide caption

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A young girl sits on her luggage as she waits in a long line with her family, hoping to board buses provided by the government to return to their homes outside Kathmandu. Diego Azubel/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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In Nepal, A Flood Of People Leave Capital To Return Home
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An elderly Japanese woman carries water past a home destroyed several days earlier on Jan. 17, 1995, by a powerful earthquake centered in Kobe, Japan. More than 6,000 people were killed and destruction was widespread, but the city was rapidly rebuilt. Lois Bernstein/AP hide caption

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(Left) Nepalese devotees participating in a procession of chariots of god and goddess Ganesh, Kumari and Bhairav during the last day of the Indrajatra festival at Durbar Square in Kathmandu, Nepal, on Sept. 22, 2013. (Right) The ruins on the Durbar Square after an earthquake in Kathmandu on Saturday. Sunil Sharma/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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A woman and child rest in the open outside a destroyed building Sunday, a day after a major earthquake leveled homes in Kumalpur village on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal. Nine people reportedly died in the small village, including four children. Narendrea Shrestha/EPA/Landov hide caption

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More Than 4,000 Dead In Nepal As Earthquake Toll Rises
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Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why
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The badly damaged Christchurch Cathedral is pictured on Sept. 7, 2011 during a tour given to foreign journalists visiting the city ahead of the rugby 2011 World Cup. England rugby manager Martin Johnson and several members of the playing squad visited the city to see the stadium and the city center which were damaged by an earthquake in February. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Will New Zealand Rebuild The Cathedral My Forefather Erected?
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