A MiG-21 fighter — a leftover monument from the Soviet era — is the centerpiece of the Aviators Neighborhood in Deveselu, Romania. Now the base has become a U.S. Navy facility that is part of NATO's anti-missile shield for Europe. Gabriel Amza for NPR hide caption

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Krzystof Przadak, a Polish builder who has lived in Britain for 12 years, at a house he's renovating in a London suburb. Przadak says he now earns 10 times what he did in Poland, but he's uncertain what will happen to him and other Poles in Britain if the U.K. votes to leave the EU on June 23. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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If Britain Leaves The EU, What Happens To The 'Polish Plumber?'

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Former Polish President Lech Walesa, shown at his office on June 20, 2012, in Gdansk, Poland. The Nobel Peace laureate has long denied accusations that he collaborated with Communist-era secret police. Jasper Juinen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jaroslaw Kaczynski sits before a large image of his twin brother, Lech Kaczynski, who was the president of Poland from 2005 until his death in a plane crash in 2010. Today Jaroslaw Kaczynski, a former prime minister of Poland, doesn't hold political office; but as the head of the Law and Justice party, he is functionally the leader of Poland. Adam Guz/Getty Images Poland/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters shout slogans during an anti-government demonstration in Warsaw, Poland, on Dec. 19. Thousands of Poles have protested the government's plans to curb the power of the Constitutional Tribunal, a check on the ruling party's authority. The bill in question passed the lower house of Parliament on Tuesday. Alik Keplicz/AP hide caption

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Monsignor Krzysztof Charamsa, left, and his partner Eduard, surname not given, leave a restaurant after a news conference in downtown Rome, on Saturday. The Vatican on Saturday fired Charamsa who came out as gay on the eve of a big meeting of the world's bishops to discuss church outreach to gays, divorcees and more traditional Catholic families. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Polish Deputy Culture Minister and Head of Conservation Piotr Zuchowski speaks at a news conference Friday in Warsaw, Poland, on the so-called Nazi gold train. Radek Pietruszka/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Marchers carried a multicolor flag during Warsaw's annual gay pride parade earlier this month. Poland prohibits gay marriage but activists say attitudes toward gays have improved in recent years. Alik Keplicz/AP hide caption

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For Poland's Gay Community, A Shift In Public Attitudes, If Not Laws

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Unmanned observation towers, funded by the European Union, have sprouted recently along Poland's border with Russia. This one is located outside the sleepy Polish border village of Parkoszewo. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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With Tensions Rising, Poland Erects Observation Towers On Russian Border

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Poland's second-largest city is also a major tourist destination. Krakow (seen here at night from the Krakus Mound) is suffering some of the worst air pollution in Europe. Arek Olek/Flickr hide caption

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Plagued By Smog, Krakow Struggles To Break Its Coal-Burning Habit

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Barbed-wire fence surrounding a military area is pictured in the forest near Stare Kiejkuty village, close to Szczytno in northeastern Poland. The CIA ran a secret jail on Polish soil, the European Court of Human Rights ruled Thursday. Kacper Pempel/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Archaeologists believe that ancient farmers used pots made from these pottery shards to make cheese — a less perishable, low-lactose milk product. Nature hide caption

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Archaeologists Find Ancient Evidence Of Cheese-Making

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