Tracy Smith, 38, and her children Hazel, 8, and Finley, 5, at their home in Houston. Smith is pregnant with twins and says she's a little more worried than usual about the approach of mosquito season. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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In Houston, Pregnant Women And Their Doctors Weigh Risks Of Zika
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A pregnant woman gets an ultrasound to monitor for the birth defect microcephaly, in Guatemala City last month. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pregnant Women May Be Able To Get Answers About Zika Earlier
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Amanda Hensley with her daughter, Valencia. Hensley says several hospitals and clinics she contacted were reluctant to help her quit her opioid habit. "Nobody wants to touch a pregnant woman with an addiction issue." Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Pregnant And Addicted: The Tough Road To Family Health
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Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger
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A medical researcher prepares tests for various diseases including Zika. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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How Best To Test For Zika Virus?
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Why Scientists Hope To Inject Some People With Zika Virus
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Most women get prenatal care from the doctor they expect will deliver the baby, which can make it difficult if the doctor and hospital are far away. Tim Hale/Getty Images hide caption

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But first, birth control? John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Women Blast CDC's Advice To Use Birth Control If Drinking Alcohol
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