Pregnant doctors are less likely than other women to deliver their babies via C-section, recent research suggests. Economists say that may be because the physician patients feel more empowered to question the obstetrician. hide caption

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A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan. Jonathan Saruk/International Medical Corps hide caption

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The baby's going to be fine, but what about your pocketbook? hide caption

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Doctors use tissue slides like this one of the ovary's outer cortex to confirm a woman's ovarian reserve. It's also the the ovary tissue that's removed in an ovarian transplant. Courtesy of the Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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By sequencing a newborn's genome, doctors could screen for more genetic conditions. But parents could be confronted with confusing or ambiguous data about their baby's health. hide caption

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Human embryos under a microscope at an IVF clinic in La Jolla, Calif. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman vetoed a bill that would spend government funds on prenatal care to illegal immigrants. He has that service for illegal immigrants should be provided by churches and private organizations, not with taxpayer money. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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