Job seekers fill out applications inside the employment center at the Six Flags Entertainment Corp. Great Adventure amusement park in Jackson, N.J., in March. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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Target shoppers Kelly Foley (from left), Debbie Winslow and Ann Rich use a smartphone to look at a competitor's prices while shopping shortly after midnight on Black Friday, in South Portland, Maine. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Job hunters line up for interviews at an employment fair in New York City. The unemployment rate tells only a partial story about the U.S. labor market. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Beyond The Unemployment Rate: Look At These 5 Labor Indicators

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A notice in a store window in New York City announces a retail job opening. Now that unemployment has slipped below 6 percent, there's renewed interest in what the Federal Reserve's target for joblessness should be. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Drop In Unemployment Raises Debate On Optimal Rate

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Sign of the times? A "help wanted" sign in the window of a Philadelphia business last year. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Yuki Noguchi and David Greene preview the jobs report

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Looking for work in Florida. At a November career fair in West Palm Beach, this man had a job application in hand. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People looking for work were filling out applications earlier this month at a career fair in Emeryville, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The scene earlier this month at a job fair in Sunrise, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Chris Arnold previews the September jobs report

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A recruiter for Cigna greets a job seeker at a career fair in Philadelphia over the summer. Mark Makela /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Mark Makela /Reuters /Landov