A Job News USA employee directs job seekers to a career fair at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium in Louisville, Ky., on May 18. New figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that the number of workers who would like to work full-time but can find only part-time work increased by nearly half a million last month. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Job seekers fill out applications inside the employment center at the Six Flags Entertainment Corp. Great Adventure amusement park in Jackson, N.J., in March. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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Target shoppers Kelly Foley (from left), Debbie Winslow and Ann Rich use a smartphone to look at a competitor's prices while shopping shortly after midnight on Black Friday, in South Portland, Maine. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Job hunters line up for interviews at an employment fair in New York City. The unemployment rate tells only a partial story about the U.S. labor market. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Beyond The Unemployment Rate: Look At These 5 Labor Indicators

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A notice in a store window in New York City announces a retail job opening. Now that unemployment has slipped below 6 percent, there's renewed interest in what the Federal Reserve's target for joblessness should be. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Drop In Unemployment Raises Debate On Optimal Rate

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