During the presidential campaign, President Trump called the Labor Department's unemployment rate "phony." The first jobs report of his presidency is due out on Friday (though it will largely be a reflection of the end of Obama's term). Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Job seekers look over forms while attending the first Los Angeles International Airport Job Fair for Veterans in Los Angeles on Sept. 14. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

A Job News USA employee directs job seekers to a career fair at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium in Louisville, Ky., on May 18. New figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that the number of workers who would like to work full-time but can find only part-time work increased by nearly half a million last month. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Job seekers fill out applications inside the employment center at the Six Flags Entertainment Corp. Great Adventure amusement park in Jackson, N.J., in March. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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