The characters of An African City (from left): Zainab, Ngozi, Nana Yaa, Sade and Makena. Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd. hide caption

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Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd.

Sex And 'An African City': A Steamy Ghanaian Show You Don't Want To Miss

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Emmanuel Kwame, 60, lost his sight to river blindness as a young man. He lives in Asubende, Ghana, earning a living as a farmer and fisherman. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

The Farmer And Fisherman Who Lost His Sight To River Blindness

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Albert Tamanja Bidim, a community volunteer, distributes ivermectin, the tablet that fights river blindness, in the Ghanaian town of Beposo 2. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

What A Difference A Drug Makes In The Fight Against River Blindness

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Ade, played by Nana Sam Elliott-Sackeyfio glows in new love at a private dinner, in the production of Bananas and Groundnuts. Courtesy of Roverman Productions hide caption

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Courtesy of Roverman Productions

Years After Its Curfew Killed Theater, Ghana Gets A Second Act

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Patrick Awuah is one of this year's MacArthur "genius" grant winners. The former Microsoft engineer was honored for establishing a new kind of school in his native Ghana. Andrew Heavens/TED hide caption

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Andrew Heavens/TED

You've got to get down — literally — when greeting someone in Northern Ghana. Kiley Shields for NPR hide caption

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Kiley Shields for NPR

Peace Corps volunteer Kiley Shields pronounces "n naa"

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Kwesi Bido, 14, (right) stops to fix 13-year-old Inusa Mohammed's flip flop. Both spend evenings and weekends searching for scrap at Agbogbloshie, an electronic waste dump in Accra, Ghana. Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo hide caption

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Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo

A Shadow Economy Lurks In An Electronics Graveyard

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Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

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Kwame Nkrumah Masoleum is the final resting place of Ghana's first president, who led the campaign to liberate Ghana from colonial rule on March 6, 1957. neate photos/flickr hide caption

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neate photos/flickr