The Shanghai Rowing Club (middle) was rescued after preservationists fought a proposed demolition. In the background to the left is the futuristic skyline of Shanghai's financial district, Lujiazui. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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After Decades, A Shanghai Preservationist Heads Home To America

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Shanghai has long had an active nightlife culture ranging from jazz clubs to — more recently — bars focused on mixology. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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'Shanghai Nightscapes': Dancing, Drinking And All That Jazz

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Home prices are rising in Shanghai, but that's not stopping buyers. Some analysts say the rise in home prices is not a sign of confidence in the economy — but of uncertainty. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sluggish Economy Doesn't Dampen Shanghai's Housing Prices

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Football has practically no history in China. Some of China's most popular sports are individual ones that don't involve physical contact, like pingpong and badminton. Chinese players say football provides an opportunity to release their aggression. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Far From Sunday's Super Bowl, A Football Championship In China

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Joel Xu, 25, drives in Shanghai for People's Uber, a ride-sharing service. He makes about $4,000 a month – a good wage in Shanghai – and loves meeting new people he'd otherwise never encounter. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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People's Republic Of Uber: Making Friends, Chauffeuring People In China

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On Jan. 1, people gathered at a makeshift memorial marking the site of a New Year's Eve stampede on the Bund in Shanghai, China. Three dozen people died, and dozens more were injured. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR reporter Frank Langfitt and one of his "customers," a biotech worker, whom he drove to a self-help conference in Shanghai's sprawling Pudong District. NPR hide caption

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Reporter Offers Free Cab Rides For Stories From 'Streets Of Shanghai'

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