A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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By combining results of common blood tests, the researchers were able to come up with a way to predict risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases. Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Jason Early has been getting dialysis for the past 18 months after his kidneys failed following complications with Type 1 diabetes. Courtesy of Jason Early hide caption

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Courtesy of Jason Early

A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar

The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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Nurses teach patients how to use equipment and do peritoneal dialysis at home. Life in View/Science Source hide caption

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Life in View/Science Source

Feds Say More People Should Try Dialysis At Home

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Diabetes alert dogs are trained to detect low blood glucose in a person. The dogs can cost $20,000, but little research has been done on their effectiveness. Frank Wisneski/Flickr hide caption

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Frank Wisneski/Flickr

There will be about 55 percent more people with diabetes as baby boomers become senior citizens, a report finds. Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images

A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source

Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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Carmen Smith now gets the insulin she needs via her doctor's prescription. When she lacked health insurance, buying a version of the medicine over the counter was cheaper, she says. But it was hard to get the dose right. Lynn Ischay for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Ischay for NPR

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

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Screening blood for high blood sugar may become more common now that an influential panel has recommended it for many overweight people. iStockphoto hide caption

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