A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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Carmen Smith now gets the insulin she needs via her doctor's prescription. When she lacked health insurance, buying a version of the medicine over the counter was cheaper, she says. But it was hard to get the dose right. Lynn Ischay for NPR hide caption

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You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

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Screening blood for high blood sugar may become more common now that an influential panel has recommended it for many overweight people. iStockphoto hide caption

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The number of people being diagnosed with diabetes has been on the decline since 2009. iStockphoto hide caption

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Fewer People Are Getting Diabetes, But The Epidemic Isn't Over

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Rajiv Kumar (left), a pediatric endocrinologist, with patient Blake Atkins. The California teenager, diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, uses Apple's HealthKit to monitor his blood sugar levels and share the information with his mother and doctor. Courtesy of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford hide caption

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People with diabetes who sign up for an Aetna insurance plan focused on diabetes care can get blood sugar meters and test strips free of charge. iStockphoto hide caption

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Jorje Mendez has lost more than 45 pounds through weightlifting and other lifestyle changes. Trainer Johnny Gonzales, right, helps prediabetic patients at the gym he set up at the Lake County Tribal Health Clinic in California. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 86 million Americans over age 20 have abnormal blood sugar levels. Over the long run, that can seriously damage the eyes, nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. iStockphoto hide caption

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A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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Diabetic patients get their feet treated at the Nauru Center of Public Health. The Pacific island nation has a high rate of type 2 diabetes. Matthieu Paley/Corbis hide caption

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Michael Arnott, of Cambridge, Mass., says he used to have trouble staying awake on long drives. Sleep specialists discovered he has obstructive sleep apnea, though not for the most common reasons — he isn't overweight, and doesn't smoke or take sedatives. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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Snooze Alert: A Sleep Disorder May Be Harming Your Body And Brain

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