The number of people being diagnosed with diabetes has been on the decline since 2009. iStockphoto hide caption

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Rajiv Kumar (left), a pediatric endocrinologist, with patient Blake Atkins. The California teenager, diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, uses Apple's HealthKit to monitor his blood sugar levels and share the information with his mother and doctor. Courtesy of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford hide caption

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People with diabetes who sign up for an Aetna insurance plan focused on diabetes care can get blood sugar meters and test strips free of charge. iStockphoto hide caption

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Jorje Mendez has lost more than 45 pounds through weightlifting and other lifestyle changes. Trainer Johnny Gonzales, right, helps prediabetic patients at the gym he set up at the Lake County Tribal Health Clinic in California. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 86 million Americans over age 20 have abnormal blood sugar levels. Over the long run, that can seriously damage the eyes, nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. iStockphoto hide caption

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A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. iStockphoto hide caption

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Diabetic patients get their feet treated at the Nauru Center of Public Health. The Pacific island nation has a high rate of type 2 diabetes. Matthieu Paley/Corbis hide caption

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Michael Arnott, of Cambridge, Mass., says he used to have trouble staying awake on long drives. Sleep specialists discovered he has obstructive sleep apnea, though not for the most common reasons — he isn't overweight, and doesn't smoke or take sedatives. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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Sierra Sandison, Miss Idaho 2014, during the "Show Us Your Shoes" parade at the Miss America pageant. Courtesy of The Miss America Organization hide caption

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A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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Psyched that it's finally spring? Shifts in the season may affect more than your mood. Corbis hide caption

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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Beginning April 1, all sugary beverages and food of "minimal-to-no nutritional value" sold on the Navajo reservation will incur an additional 2-cent tax. April Sorrow/Flickr hide caption

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Johnny Reynolds ignored diabetes symptoms and put off going to the doctor for years when he didn't have health insurance. He was afraid he couldn't afford treatment. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

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