Health researchers say the proportion of people in their late 40s to 60s with diabetes, hypertension or obesity has increased over the past two decades. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Aging Poorly: Another Act Of Baby Boomer Rebellion

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Cameron Harris, who has had Type 1 diabetes since he was 8 years old, explains the ins and outs of using glucagon for blood sugar lows. Harris hosts a video podcast series called "In Range" on YouTube. Harwood Podcast Network/YouTube hide caption

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Harwood Podcast Network/YouTube

Social Media Help Diabetes Patients (And Drugmakers) Connect

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Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Morris/NPR

When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

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Karlton Hill, 15, was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 12. He works hard to manage the disease: He jogs and does pushups every day; he takes metformin is very careful about what he eats. Leslie Capo/LSU Health Sciences Center hide caption

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Leslie Capo/LSU Health Sciences Center

A Dire Sign Of The Obesity Epidemic: Teen Diabetes Soaring, Study Finds

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Treat, Even Reverse, Diabetes

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Researchers say that if the price of soda gets higher, people will drink less of it, which will lead to fewer deaths. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images