Beaver barbecue at Bootleggin' BBQ in St. Louis, Mo. Though many Catholics abstain from eating meat on Fridays during Lent, in some parts of the country, water-dwelling mammals have long been considered fair game. Alan Greenblatt for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Alan Greenblatt for NPR

Tastes like chicken, but it's OK for Lent: Fried alligator, as served at New Orleans' Cochon restaurant. Chris Granger/Courtesy of Cochon hide caption

toggle caption Chris Granger/Courtesy of Cochon

Forget Fish Fridays: In Louisiana, Gator Is On The Lenten Menu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/175058833/175293851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young parishioner carries plates filled with fried fish and potatoes to a table during a Lenten Friday fish fry at St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Church in Littleton, Colo., in 2009. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption David Zalubowski/AP

A man dressed as a skomorokh, a medieval East Slavic harlequin, distributes bliny in St. Petersburg, Russia, during the last day of Maslenitsa, March 1, 2009. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

Maslenitsa Celebration Helps Russians Thaw From Winter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/174097702/174542910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">