Damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant, from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Tokyo Electric Power Co. hide caption

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A Japanese flag waved Wednesday over the the wreckage and devastation in Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture. Yasuyoshi Chiba /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A destroyed bus still sits on a roof of a building in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. It settled there after the March 11 tsunami that swept over the coast. Yasuyoshi Chiba /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Women were sorting fish earlier today at the Hirakata Fish Market in Kitaibaraki, Ibaraki Prefecture. It was the first time the market had been open since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way

Leak At Japanese Nuclear Plant 'Seems To Be Decreasing'

The operator of the crippled plant says that efforts to inject a hardening agent beneath a concrete pit at the site may be working.

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When a massive earthquake struck Japan on March 11, triggering a tsunami, the city of Rikuzentakata's famous pine trees were wiped away — except for this one. Now it is a symbol of hope for a devastated nation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers walked in a line after finding the body of a boy in the rubble in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture earlier today (March 31, 2011). Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Earlier today (March 29, 2011), a boy watched his father being screened for radiation at a shelter in Fukushima prefecture. Wally Santana/AP hide caption

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