Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, shown in 2013, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick to head the EPA. Pruitt's outspoken criticism of climate change and his close ties to the energy industry have raised concerns about his ability to lead the agency. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sue Ogrocki/AP
Adam Cole/NPR

Could You Power Your Home With A Bike?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504790589/504865088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After 43 years of cranking out electricity, the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant is shutting down. The plant was licensed until 2033, but will go offline 17 years earlier than planned. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Flickr

Waste, Families Left Behind As Nuclear Plants Close

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498842677/499121111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Consumer advocates took to the streets of Phoenix recently to protest against an Arizona utility's efforts to bill customers using a so-called "demand charge." If approved, Arizona Public Service would be the first utility in the country to place most of its residential customers on that kind of rate plan. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Will Stone/KJZZ

Uber But For Energy: Utility Surge Pricing Threatens Summer Cool

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485120563/487264333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Logger Greg Hemmerich and his crew feed low-value trees into a wood chipper, before bringing the chips to ReEnergy Holdings' biomass plant in Lyonsdale, N.Y. David Sommerstein/NCPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Sommerstein/NCPR

Is Burning Trees Still Green? Some Experts Now Question Biomass

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482937940/485661756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eric Frumin (right) stands in front of his solar panels on the roof of his Brooklyn home alongside architect David Cunningham (left) and AeonSolar's Allen Frishman (center). Courtesy of Eric Frumin hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Eric Frumin

One of the sites for the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve lies within salt caverns 2,000 feet below the ground near Freeport, Texas. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Low Oil Prices Fuel Reconsideration Of Petroleum Reserves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482785440/482900218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz takes part in a press conference at the end of the 2015 meeting of the International Energy Agency Governing Board on Nov. 18, 2015 in Paris. ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Says Government Can Help Clean Energy Innovation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479942451/479957477" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Akhararat W/iStockphoto.com

Nevada Solar Power Business Struggles To Keep The Lights On

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470097580/470120020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rob Oberg delivers oil to a home in south central Vermont. He works for Keyser Energy in Proctor, Vt., which provides heating fuel to about 5,000 customers. Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio

Homeowners Who Played The Odds On Oil Heating Costs Lose Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464003319/464266322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Heartland Biogas facility in Weld County, Colo., is one of the country's largest waste treatment plants that converts methane to natural gas. Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy

From Poop To Power: Colorado Explores New Sources Of Renewable Energy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461692939/461714379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript