Containers hold genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes before being released in Panama City, Panama, in September 2014. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Florida Keys Opposition Stalls Tests Of Genetically Altered Mosquitoes

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Larry Smart, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitoes in an effort to stop a possible Zika outbreak in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Steps Up Mosquito Control Efforts After Suspected Zika Cases

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Louis Fernandez walks along a flooded Collins Avenue in Miami Beach in September 2015. The city is tackling sea-level rise by rebuilding roads and installing new storm sewers and pumps. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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As Waters Rise, Miami Beach Builds Higher Streets And Political Willpower

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Passengers travel on one of the ferries that cut across Havana Bay from Casablanca to Old Havana in July 2015. While the Obama administration has approved licenses to companies that want to offer services to Miami, the plans are still controversial on both sides. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Plan For Cuba Ferry Terminal Reveals Shift In Miami Politics

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Attendees at a gun show in Miami have mixed feelings about Obama's executive actions. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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How Obama's Proposals Are Playing Out At Gun Shows

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The graffiti artist, Trek6, painted the Yoruba goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, to honor his Caribbean roots. She symbolizes growth, something that he thinks Hialeah needs. Mandalit del Barco/NPR hide caption

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Miami Area Muralists Rouse A New Reputation For An Industrial City

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Poet Richard Blanco says that appearing at President Obama's second inauguration made him feel as if, for the first time, he "had a place at the American table." Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Leza One paints a mural on a wall of Jose de Diego Middle School in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood. It's a project that coincides with the citywide Art Basel fair. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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A Miami School Goes From Blank Canvas To Mural-Covered

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The $1 billion Brickell City Centre, currently under construction, will house condos, a hotel and a retail and entertainment complex. Condo projects are booming in Miami, financed mostly by foreign buyers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Foreign Dollars Fuel A New Condo Boom In Miami

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Giant African land snails, like this one found in Florida in 2011, eat almost any plant. Florida officials are determined to eradicate the invasive pest. Andrew Derksen/Florida Department of Agriculture/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Florida's Hunt For Giant Snails Leads To 'Smelly Easter Eggs'

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Ian Burrell, a rum ambassador from the U.K., samples the liquor at the Miami Rum Festival. Tatu Kaarlas/Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival hide caption

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Tatu Kaarlas/Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival

Rum Renaissance Revives The Spirit's Rough Reputation

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Former soccer star David Beckham holds a ball at a news conference where he announced he's exercising an option to buy a Major League Soccer expansion team in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Courtesy of Lloyd Goradesky

Greg Allen on 'Morning Edition'

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