earth earth

This composite of 30 images of asteroid 2014 JO25 was generated with radar data collected using NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar in California's Mojave Desert. NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR

A computer illustration of a large asteroid colliding with Earth. (Size may not be to scale.) Such an impact is believed to have led to the death of the dinosaurs some 66 million years ago. Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

The oversized book Under Water, Under Earth brings to vibrant life underwater and underground processes and activities. Candlewick Press hide caption

toggle caption
Candlewick Press

The Geologic History of Earth. Note the timescales. We are currently in the Holocene, which has been warm and moist and a great time to grow human civilization. But the activity of civilization is now pushing the planet into a new epoch which scientists call the Anthropocene. Ray Troll/Troll Art hide caption

toggle caption
Ray Troll/Troll Art

Paleontologist Peter Ward speaking on the TED stage. Andrew Heavens/TED hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Heavens/TED

Are We Headed Into Another Mass Extinction?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495640221/495940847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara speaks at TED in 2016. Bret Hartman /TED hide caption

toggle caption
Bret Hartman /TED

How Can Dinosaurs Help Us Understand Our Own Species?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495682492/495941129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Proxima Centauri lies in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), just over four light-years from Earth. Although it looks bright through the eye of Hubble, Proxima Centauri is not visible to the naked eye. ESA/Hubble & NASA hide caption

toggle caption
ESA/Hubble & NASA

With this shot of Mount Fuji, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted, "your majesty casts a wide shadow!" Scott Kelly/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Kelly/NASA

Astronaut's Photos From Space Change How We See Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470143112/470194275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly takes a selfie inside the cupola, a special module that provides a 360-degree view of Earth. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA