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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Poverty Wages For U.S. Child Care Workers May Be Behind High Turnover

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A man speaks with a potential employer Sept. 13 at a job fair in Hartford, Conn. Recent wage gains reflect the steady healing of the labor market since the worst of the Great Recession. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

An employee moves cement blocks at the Cement Products Manufacturing Co. facility in Redmond, Ore. Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the labor force since the 1960s. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Economic Mystery: Why Are Men Leaving The Workforce?

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Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky

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Samsung is the largest employer and premier place to work in South Korea. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

To The List Of High-Stakes Tests In Korea, Add The Samsung SAT

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Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plays with children as he inspects a day care center in Yokohama in 2013. More than 20,000 Japanese children are on wait lists for day care. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Will More Day Care Help Boost Japan's Sluggish Economy?

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Ellsworth Ashman lost his middle-skill job at Entenmann's on Long Island, N.Y., last year. Now he's working at a job that pays half of what he made at the bakery. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Despite Recovery, Middle-Wage Workers Are Being Squeezed Out

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Employee Or Contractor? New U.S. Guidelines Could Reclassify Workers

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School-Lunch Program Provides Unexpected Benefits For Rural Indian Women

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José Moncada, 16, signed up for a summer youth employment program in New York City. He said hopes to earn enough to help his family, which lives on less than $30,000 a year. Kaomi Goetz for NPR hide caption

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Kaomi Goetz for NPR

Teens Hoping For More Jobs, Higher Wages This Summer

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In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper. Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

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With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

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Measles vaccine isn't a part of most workplaces. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Can Employers Require Workers To Be Vaccinated? It Depends

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A notice in a store window in New York City announces a retail job opening. Now that unemployment has slipped below 6 percent, there's renewed interest in what the Federal Reserve's target for joblessness should be. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Drop In Unemployment Raises Debate On Optimal Rate

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