Employees work on the construction of an "ice wall" last month at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. March 11 marked the fifth anniversary of the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami that caused meltdowns at Fukushima. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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A Tokyo Electric Power Co. staffer measures the radiation level as others work on the construction of an ice wall at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant on July 9, 2014. Kimmimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Water, Soil And Radiation: Why Fukushima Will Take Decades To Clean Up
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An aerial view of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, on March 11. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima
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This is a DigitalGlobe image of the 5-megawatt (electric) reactor at North Korea's Yongbyon facility, Aug. 31, with steam seen coming from the electrical power generation building. DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d/via Getty Images hide caption

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As they inspected an underground storage pool near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier this month, Tokyo Electric Power Co. President Naomi Hirose (4th from left) and other officials wore protective suits and masks. Radioactive water stored in some of the pits has leaked. Tokyo Electric Power Co./Reuters /Landov hide caption

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