In a photo from March 2011, then-U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos visits the Tohoku region, hardest hit by the tsunami and earthquake. He and his team then started the Tomodachi (Friends) Initiative to help young survivors. Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos hide caption

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Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos

After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'

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This San Francisco home collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which also claimed dozens of lives. ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Quake Warning System Could Save Lives When Seconds Count

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An aerial view of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, on March 11. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima

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Farmer Magoichi Shigihara checks on his cucumber farm in Nihonmatsu in Fukushima prefecture, about 31 miles west of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, in May 2011. Testing shows radiation in foods grown and raised in Fukushima is back to pre-accident levels. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A worker walks inside the turbine hall of the Sizewell nuclear plant in eastern England in 2006. The U.K. government on Monday announced that French-owned EDF would build the first new British nuclear power station in 20 years. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

A road leading back to the Togawas' old home in the seaside village of Namie is closed due to radioactive contamination. Geoff Brumfiel/NPR hide caption

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Geoff Brumfiel/NPR

Depression And Anxiety Could Be Fukushima's Lasting Legacy

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Markets in the port city of Soma, in Fukushima, Japan, are once again selling local seafood. In this file photo, volunteers help clean up a Soma seafood restaurant damaged in last March's tsunami and earthquake. Hiro Komae/AP hide caption

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Hiro Komae/AP

A Tokyo sushi restaurant displays blocks of fat meat tuna cut out from a 269kg bluefin tuna. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Nuclear Tuna Is Hot News, But Not Because It's Going To Make You Sick

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A woman wipes tears from her eyes as she smiles after tasting the sake she and her father made — their first batch since the Fukushima disaster forced them to leave their ancestral brewery. NPR hide caption

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Irradiation is most often used to kill insects, parasites, or bacteria in or on spices, which are typically dried outdoors in before being shipped. Lui Kit Wong/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Lui Kit Wong/MCT /Landov

A Tokyo Electric Power Co. worker looks at gauges in the control room for Units 1 and 2 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, Wednesday. AP Photo/Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency hide caption

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AP Photo/Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency