Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, while speaking to the media in September after the passage of California's End Of Life Option Act. Maynard was an advocate for the law. Carl Costas/AP hide caption

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Van Zyl and Garcia Flores hold hands as van Zyl promises to do everything she can to ease his pain and control symptoms. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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A Palliative Care Doctor Weighs California's New Aid-In-Dying Law

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As life draws to an end, compassion is more important than food. Kacso Sandor/iStockphoto hide caption

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A Nurse Reflects On The Privilege Of Caring For Dying Patients

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Christy O'Donnell, who has advanced lung cancer, is one of several California patients suing for the right to get a doctor's help with prescription medicine to end their own lives if and when they feel that's necessary. YouTube hide caption

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For best quality of life, many cancer patients who can't be cured might do best to forgo chemo and focus instead on pain relief and easing sleep and mood problems, a survey of caregivers suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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What If Chemo Doesn't Help You Live Longer Or Better?

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When Weed Is The Cure: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana

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In the movie The Fault in Our Stars, having terminal cancer doesn't look so bad for Hazel, played by Shailene Woodley, and Gus, played by Ansel Elgort. James Bridges/Temple Hill Entertainment/Kobal Collection hide caption

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Hawaii ranks 49th in the nation for use of home health care services during the last six months of someone's life. Videos from ACP Decisions show patients what their options are at the end of life. ACP Decisions hide caption

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Videos On End-Of-Life Choices Ease Tough Conversation

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Palliative medicine physician Michael Fratkin gets off a plane after visiting a patient on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation. He's recently launched a startup to support this kind of work. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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Rural Doctor Launches Startup To Ease Pain Of Dying Patients

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Paula and Ron Faber walk their dog Millie in 2009, between cancer diagnoses. Shelley Seccombe/Shelley Seccombe hide caption

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Terminally Ill, But Constantly Hospitalized

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Patients who get the comforts of palliative care as well as disease treatment live longer, studies show, than those who only get treatment for the disease. Annette Birkenfeld/iStockphoto hide caption

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