After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes
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Gary Matli, a field supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, inspects a disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Faced With Spate Of Tremors, Oklahoma Looks To Shake Up Its Oil Regulations
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A truckload of seed wheat and rye awaits planting near Orlando, Okla., back in 2012, when the price per bushel of wheat was 50 percent higher than it is now. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Low Wheat Prices Leave A Gluten Glut At Midwest's Grain Elevators
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Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why
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Cushing, Okla., is a major oil storage site. Amid record oil production, some analysts worry the U.S. will run out of places to put it all. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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With So Much Oil Flowing, U.S. May Be Reaching Storage Limits
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University of Oklahoma students march to the now-closed Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house during a rally against racism Tuesday. Two former members of the fraternity have apologized for their roles in a video that showed them singing a racist chant. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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A rally was held outside the University of Oklahoma's Evans Hall on Monday to protest a video featuring racist chants allegedly by Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members. Two people in the video were expelled Tuesday. Jacob McCleland/KGOU hide caption

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Corrections officer Sgt. Charles Galaviz secures an inmate for transfer with handcuffs and shackles Jan. 24 at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, in Lexington, Okla. Overtime is mandatory for correctional officers in the state's prisons, which have a manpower shortage of about 33 percent and the highest inmate homicide rate in the country. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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States Face Correctional Officer Shortage Amid A Cultural Stigma
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Drilling rigs dot the landscape near Calumet, Okla., in April 2013. Oklahoma's economy blossomed during the domestic fracking boom, but as the price of crude oil drops, that could change. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Analysts Fear A Prolonged Drop In Oil Prices Will Hurt Oklahoma's Banks
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An oil and gas facility in Roger Mills County in far-western Oklahoma. The governor is warning state agencies that low oil prices could stall the state economy. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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'Kings When It's Good': Oklahoma Braces For Possible Crude Crash
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Nebraska and Oklahoma say Colorado's marijuana law is unconstitutional, in a challenge to the law in the Supreme Court. Earlier this month, visitors from Texas smell marijuana at the Breckenridge Cannabis Club. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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A wind-powered water pump and a wind-driven electricity turbine share a field near the town of Calumet in western Oklahoma. Joe Wertz/NPR hide caption

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Oklahoma Wind Power Companies Run Into Headwinds
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