Shawn Sheehan, Oklahoma's 2016 Teacher of the Year, sits in his classroom one last time before moving to Texas for better pay. Emily Wendler/KOSU hide caption

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Emily Wendler/KOSU

Teacher Of The Year In Oklahoma Moves To Texas For The Money

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In November, voters in Oklahoma approved criminal justice reforms such as making possession of drugs a misdemeanor and redirecting state money to treatment programs. Now there are several bills to repeal the reforms. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Oklahoma Lawmakers File Bills To Repeal Criminal Justice Reforms

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Gas prices seen at an Oklahoma City 7-Eleven in December. Amid a state budget slump, Oklahoma lawmakers are considering raising gas taxes for the first time in 30 years. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Gas Taxes May Go Up Around The Country As States Seek To Plug Budget Holes

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Herman "Dub" Tolbert, shown inside an American Legion post in Bokoshe, Okla., says the community is left exposed and he's determined to make regulators listen. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Communities Uneasy As Utilities Look For Places To Store Coal Ash

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Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House on Wednesday. On Friday, Fallin vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Robert Bates arrives for his arraignment at the Tulsa County Courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., on April 21, 2015. Bates has been convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes

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