tornadoes tornadoes

A severe thunderstorm wall cloud is seen over the area of Canton, Miss., on Tuesday. At least 35 people in six states have been killed by tornadoes unleashed by a ferocious storm system this week. Gene Blevins/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gene Blevins/Reuters/Landov

One of the homes destroyed in Washington, Ill., by Sunday's storms. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

On 'Morning Edition': 'Midwest Tornadoes Send Residents Scrambling'

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A firefighter searches through debris in Washington, Ill., on Sunday. Tornadoes and severe weather roared through the area earlier in the day. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

On 'Morning Edition': WCBU's Denise Molina reports on the storms that hit Illinois

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Data released Tuesday shows that the deadly El Reno tornado that struck Friday was the widest every recorded in the U.S., at 2.6 miles. National Weather Service hide caption

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National Weather Service

Friday's storm, which produced a mile-wide tornado, as it neared El Reno, Okla. Richard Rowe /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Richard Rowe /Reuters /Landov

Why Chase Tornadoes? To Save Lives, Not To 'Die Ourselves'

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After the storm: Sheet metal that was torn off a building during Friday's tornado in El Reno, Okla., ended up caught in a tree. Bill Waugh /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Bill Waugh /Reuters /Landov