Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

toggle caption U.S. Food and Drug Administration

In the past two years, many food companies — including candy-makers — have decided to label their products as non-GMO. Because practically all sugar beets in the U.S. are genetically modified, those food products are now using sugar derived from sugar cane. There is no genetically modified sugar cane. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Tetra Images/Getty Images

As Big Candy Ditches GMOs, Sugar Beet Farmers Hit A Sour Patch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477793556/477836070" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sugar beet. This crop supplies about half of America's sugar. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

The Environmental Cost Of Growing Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476600965/476954766" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of the main attractions in "The Edible Monument" exhibition at the Getty Center in Los Angeles is a nine-foot long sugar palace showing the Greek sorceress Circe meeting Odysseus' men. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

Ah, sugar — we love the sweetness, but not the calories. For more than a century, food technologists have been on a quest for the perfect, guilt-free substitute. The latest candidate, allulose, is not available to consumers in a crystal form: It is a syrup only available to manufacturers. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ryan Kellman/NPR

In The Search For The Perfect Sugar Substitute, Another Candidate Emerges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434597445/434668784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Joseph Severn's portrait of Percy Bysshe Shelley. The radical 19th century poet practiced the politics of the plate. For Shelley and other liberals of his day, keeping sugar out of tea was a political statement against slavery. Joseph Severn/Wikimedia hide caption

toggle caption Joseph Severn/Wikimedia

The average American consumes the equivalent of 19.5 teaspoons a day in added sugars, but there are no federal guidelines recommending a limit. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

The majority of voters in San Francisco and Berkeley, Calif., voted in favor of a soda tax, but the measure didn't gain the required two-thirds majority required in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

toggle caption California Center for Public Health Advocacy