Alabama Alabama

Sureshbhai Patel lies in a bed at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, Ala., on Feb. 7. Patel was severely injured when police threw him to the ground. Chirag Patel/AP hide caption

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Chirag Patel/AP

Ala. Governor Apologizes To Indian Government In 'Excessive Force' Case

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Chirag Patel stands in his neighborhood in Madison, Ala., where his father, Sureshbhai Patel, was severely injured by police. Visiting from India, the elder Patel was staying with his son, his wife and child in their Madison home. Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov

The Rev. Charles Perry of Unity Church, in Birmingham, Ala., marries Curtis Stephens, center, and his partner of 30 years, Pat Helms, Monday at the Jefferson County Courthouse. Alabama began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the marriages in the state. Hal Yeager/AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/AP

Supreme Court Won't Stop Gay Marriages In Alabama

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Robert Bate of Birmingham holds signs endorsing same-sex marriage outside the Jefferson County Courthouse in Birmingham, Ala., Monday. On Tuesday, the chief justice of the state's Supreme Court said federal courts are overstepping their jurisdiction in deciding cases about the issue. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

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Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Officer William Stacy with Helen Johnson after donated food was delivered to her. Stacy bought a carton of eggs for Johnson when she was caught stealing eggs from a store in Tarrant, Ala. Johnson says the act of kindness changed her life. Joe Songer/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Joe Songer/AL.COM /Landov

Cynthia Thomas puts labels on bottles of moonshine near Union Springs, Ala., Friday, Oct. 25, 2013. Last year, High Ridge Spirits — Alabama's first legal distillery since Prohibition — joined the growing trend of more than 600 craft distilleries operating around the country. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

Getting Your 'Shine On Is Becoming Increasingly Legal

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State Reps. Barry Moore, Joe Hubbard, Rod Scott and Merika Coleman study a map of the proposed redistricting plan in May 2012 following a meeting of the Legislative Committee on Reapportionment at the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery, Ala. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

At The Supreme Court, Tracing A Fine Line Between Politics And Race

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This photo, taken at Katherine Tucker Windham's Selma house, shows reporter Nikki Davis Maute — and in the background, some say, the spirit the family calls Jeffrey. University of Alabama Press hide caption

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University of Alabama Press

Spine-Tingling With A Twang: Great Alabama Ghost Stories

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Fashion designer Natalie Chanin stands in front of in-progress garments at the Alabama Chanin Factory. Chanin and Billy Reid, internationally acclaimed designers, have teamed up to test the concept of organic, sustainable cotton farming and garment-making. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Reviving A Southern Industry, From Cotton Field To Clothing Rack

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Inmates from several Alabama state prisons take a math class at J.F. Ingram State Technical College. The campus becomes a medium-security facility when the students arrive. Dan Carsen/WBHM hide caption

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Dan Carsen/WBHM

Budget Cuts Threaten A Unique Alabama Prison Education Program

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