State Rep. Dickie Drake, who sponsored Alabama's new cursive law, says it's about making sure that state's students know how to perform important life tasks, such as signing their name. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

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Visitors walk outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 14. The court announced on Monday that it has unanimously reversed an Alabama Supreme Court ruling that denied parental rights to a lesbian adoptive mother who had split with her partner. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Same-Sex Adoption Upheld By U.S. Supreme Court

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Martha Shearer got her voting rights back after serving time for a drug conviction. But her brother, convicted of a similar crime, was not able to get his voting rights restored. Gigi Douban/WBHM hide caption

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In Fight For Ballot Access, 'Moral Turpitude' Becomes A Litmus Test In One State

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Tight end O.J. Howard of the Alabama Crimson Tide scores a 53-yard touchdown Monday in the third quarter against the Clemson Tigers during the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship Game in Glendale, Ariz. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Sloss Furnace in Birmingham, Ala., produced iron for decades. The site closed in the 1970s and is now a national historic landmark. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

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Concerned Workers Face Dwindling Industry And Layoffs With A Steely Resolve

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Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat touched off the Montgomery bus boycott and the beginning of the civil rights movement, is fingerprinted by police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 22, 1956, when she was among several others charged with violating segregation laws. Gene Herrick/AP hide caption

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In Montgomery, Rosa Parks' Story Offers A History Lesson For Police

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The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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At Southern Factory, Workers Try Again To Unionize

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