Contractors, volunteers and members of the Georgia National Guard helped move this car on Thursday. It was one of more than 2,000 vehicles abandoned Tuesday when a wicked winter storm left roads covered in ice. Brant Sanderlin /MCT/Landov hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Anthony Orsi, left, and Staff Sgt. Raymond Novak of the Army National Guard helped Lauren Gates (in vehicle) retrieve her car Thursday from the Cumberland Boulevard exit ramp along I-75 North in Atlanta. Guard members and police were working to reunite drivers with more than 2,000 cars. Daniel Shirey/Getty Images hide caption

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A winter storm dumped snow Tuesday along Interstate 20/59 near downtown Birmingham and on other parts of central and southern Alabama. Tamika Moore/Al.com /Landov hide caption

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Tuesday night's forecast for the lower 48 states shows temperatures below freezing (the shades of blue and purple) across most of the nation. National Weather Service hide caption

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Here we go again. Earlier this month in St. Louis, Jerome Harris bundled up against frigid temperatures. Now, cold air is again rushing south from the Arctic and a "bomb" of a storm is brewing across much of the Eastern half of the nation. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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From the NPR Newscast: 'Bombogenesis'

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At the Australian Bat Clinic in Queensland, 15 baby flying foxes (bats) were lined up and ready to be fed Thursday. They were brought there to get out of the extreme heat, which has killed hundreds of thousands of bats. Trish Wimberley/AP hide caption

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Hell, Mich., is embracing its frozen fame. The town's Facebook page now features this photo from 2003. Keasha LeClear-Morse/Facebook.com/gotohellmichigan hide caption

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A man walks through a steam cloud in frigid cold temperatures Tuesday in Manhattan. Brendan McDermid /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ice has built up along Lake Michigan in Chicago as temperatures have plunged in recent days. A dip in the polar vortex is to blame. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': science writer Andrew Freedman talks with NPR's David Greene about the polar vortex

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