Ronny Marty, who's from the Dominican Republic, came to the U.S. with the promise of a job. He ended up living in a tiny apartment with three men, with most of his earnings going back to his employer. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

A child gold miner in Watsa, northeastern Congo. 2004 Marcus Bleasdale hide caption

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Marcus Bleasdale

Today's Slaves Often Work For Enterprises That Destroy The Environment

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Thai and Burmese fishing boat workers sit inside a cell at the compound of a fishing company in Benjina, Indonesia on Nov. 22, 2014. The imprisoned men were considered slaves who might run away. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

Malaysia, Cuba Taken Off U.S. Human Trafficking Blacklist

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A 3,000-ton cargo ship at Thajeen Port in Samut Sakhon, Thailand, 15 days after it set sail from Benjina, Indonesia. The company that owns the ship said it is not involved with the fishermen. "We only carry the shipment and we are hired, in general, by clients," said owner Panya Luangsomboon. "We're separated from the fishing boats." Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

Was Your Seafood Caught By Slaves? AP Uncovers Unsavory Trade

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Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour. Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR hide caption

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Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

The Daulatdia brothel is the largest in Bangladesh, with more 2,000 prostitutes. Many arrived here after being kidnapped by gangs, sold by family members or lured with promises of good jobs. Lisa Wiltse/Corbis hide caption

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Lisa Wiltse/Corbis