A 3,000-ton cargo ship at Thajeen Port in Samut Sakhon, Thailand, 15 days after it set sail from Benjina, Indonesia. The company that owns the ship said it is not involved with the fishermen. "We only carry the shipment and we are hired, in general, by clients," said owner Panya Luangsomboon. "We're separated from the fishing boats." Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Wong Maye-E/AP

Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour. Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

The Daulatdia brothel is the largest in Bangladesh, with more 2,000 prostitutes. Many arrived here after being kidnapped by gangs, sold by family members or lured with promises of good jobs. Lisa Wiltse/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Lisa Wiltse/Corbis

EU Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmström said Monday that "trafficking in human beings is all around us, closer than we think." European Union hide caption

itoggle caption European Union

Sarura Ali (right) covered her eyes from wind-blown dust as she stood with her six children outside a food distribution point in the Dadaab refugee camp in northeastern Kenya on Tuesday (July 5, 2011). Sarura, her husband and their children trekked for eight days from their home in Sakow, Somalia. War and drought are forcing many Somalis to take desperate measures. Roberto Schmidt /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Roberto Schmidt /AFP/Getty Images