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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and celebrity chef Tom Colicchio discuss the farm bill as part of the Plate of the Union campaign on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Food Policy Act hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Food Policy Act

Celebrity Chef Tom Colicchio: 'We Can End Hunger In This Country'

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Schools Will Soon Have To Put In Writing If They 'Lunch Shame'

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New Mexico state Sen. Michael Padilla says he has heard of "lunch shaming" practices around the country, including students being given different food if they can't afford the regular hot lunch. Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images

Lawmaker's Childhood Experience Drives New Mexico's 'Lunch Shaming' Ban

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Student Nicola Hopper, 11, and Jake Hensley, 11, load milk cartons and other food collected by students at Franklin Sherman Elementary School into crates to be taken across the street to Share food pantry at McLean Baptist Church. Victoria Milko/NPR hide caption

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Victoria Milko/NPR

When Food Banks Say No To Sugary Junk, Schools Offer A Solution

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School lunch can be intensely lonely when you don't have anyone to sit with. A new app aims to help change that. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

Teen Creates App So Bullied Kids Never Have To Eat Alone

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Students eat breakfast at the Blueberry Harvest School at Harrington Elementary School in Harrington, Maine. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Students at Doherty Middle School in Andover, Mass., choose items from the salad bar in the school cafeteria, June 2012. Among other things, a Senate compromise on school nutrition standards calls for the USDA and the CDC to establish new guidance that would encourage the use of salad bars. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty hide caption

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty

Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Kris Connor/Getty Images

Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A school lunch tray featuring whole wheat tortillas at the School Nutrition Association conference in July 2014. The association is asking Congress to relax the federal school nutrition standards in hopes of attracting more kids back to the school lunch line. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

In some Indian states, efforts to serve eggs to malnourished children are a political minefield. See the related animation, "Power Lunch: India's Mid-Day Meal Program," produced by Mathilde Dratwa for the Pulitzer Center and based on Rhitu Chatterjee's reporting. Lisa LaBracio/Courtesy of the Pulitzer Center hide caption

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Lisa LaBracio/Courtesy of the Pulitzer Center

Texas' agricultural commissioner wants to do away with a decade-old ban on deep fryers and soda machines in schools. Josh Banks/iStockphoto hide caption

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Josh Banks/iStockphoto

Freedom With Fries? Texas Official Wants Deep Fryers Back In Schools

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