Students eat breakfast at the Blueberry Harvest School at Harrington Elementary School in Harrington, Maine. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Students at Doherty Middle School in Andover, Mass., choose items from the salad bar in the school cafeteria, June 2012. Among other things, a Senate compromise on school nutrition standards calls for the USDA and the CDC to establish new guidance that would encourage the use of salad bars. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty hide caption

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Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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A school lunch tray featuring whole wheat tortillas at the School Nutrition Association conference in July 2014. The association is asking Congress to relax the federal school nutrition standards in hopes of attracting more kids back to the school lunch line. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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In some Indian states, efforts to serve eggs to malnourished children are a political minefield. See the related animation, "Power Lunch: India's Mid-Day Meal Program," produced by Mathilde Dratwa for the Pulitzer Center and based on Rhitu Chatterjee's reporting. Lisa LaBracio/Courtesy of the Pulitzer Center hide caption

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Texas' agricultural commissioner wants to do away with a decade-old ban on deep fryers and soda machines in schools. Josh Banks/iStockphoto hide caption

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Freedom With Fries? Texas Official Wants Deep Fryers Back In Schools
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Dakota Valley Elementary School kitchen manager Della Curry said she "knew the whole time it was a firing offense" to give out free lunches. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Lunch Lady Knows There's No Quick Fix For Feeding Hungry Kids
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Frito-Lay reformulated Flamin' Hot Cheetos, a perennial favorite among school kids, to meet new federal "Smart Snack" rules for schools. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Guess What Makes The Cut As A 'Smart Snack' In Schools? Hot Cheetos
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A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr hide caption

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A baked potato with toppings on a lunch tray at a school in Wisconsin. Students are less likely to eat fruits and vegetables if they're rushing to get to recess, researchers say. Micheal Sears/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Erica Johnson prays before her meal. She volunteers at the food pantry at John Still school where three of her four children are students. She eats alone after she feeds her kids. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Beyond Free Lunch: Schools Open Food Pantries For Hungry Families
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When it comes to salty french fries or pizza served at lunch, schools may get more time to dial back sodium content, thanks to a provision in the federal spending bill headed for a vote on Capitol Hill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Students are given healthy choices on a lunch line at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. To keep students from tossing out the fruits and vegetables they're served, researchers say it helps to give them a choice in what they put on their trays. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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