Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

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Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

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Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Got Back Pain? Try Yoga Or Massage Before Reaching For The Pills

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Monica Bill Barnes (left) and Anna Bass are offering literally breathtaking tours of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Paula Lobo/The Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

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Paula Lobo/The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Raise Your (He)art Rate With A Workout At The Met

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Interval training includes bursts of high-intensity efforts sandwiched by periods of less activity. Jonathan Cohen/Flickr hide caption

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Jonathan Cohen/Flickr

Does 1-Minute Interval Training Work? We Ask The Guy Who Tested It

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Jaime Rangel helps Gustavo Ruiz, 12, align a tire on his bike, at a recent community event in southeast Fresno, Calif. As manager for Bici Projects, Rangel promotes cycling in the Latino community as a great way to get in shape. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Ben Lecomte has swum across the Atlantic Ocean, and now he aims to traverse the Pacific, which will take him five or six months. Bongani Mlambo/The Longest Swim hide caption

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Bongani Mlambo/The Longest Swim

Can Extreme Exercise Hurt Your Heart? Swim The Pacific To Find Out

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Lower-back pain is one of the top three reasons that Americans go to the doctor. But the solution can be a DIY project. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Forget The Gizmos: Exercise Works Best For Lower-Back Pain

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Four pregnant women sit in lotus position. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Say Yes To Down Dog: More Yoga Poses Are Safe During Pregnancy

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Take A Hike To Do Your Heart And Spirit Good

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