Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak sits in the defendant's cage during his verdict hearing in a retrial for embezzlement on Saturday in the capital Cairo. The Egyptian court sentenced Mubarak and his two sons to three years in prison. APAIMAGES/APA/Landov hide caption

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Protester chant slogans in downtown Cairo, Egypt, on Sunday to mark the fourth anniversary of of the 2011 uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak. Several people have been killed in clashes with security forces. Hassan Mohamed/AP hide caption

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Tunisian voter Dina Ghlisse, 19, displays her finger with the indelible ink mark after voting in La Marsa, on the outskirts of Tunis, on Sunday. More than three years after Tunisia sparked the Arab Spring, the country is choosing a president. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

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Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, 86, lies on a gurney next to his son, Gamal, second left, in the defendants cage, during a court hearing in Cairo, on Saturday. He and his sons saw earlier convictions on murder overturned by the court. Tarek el-Gabbas/AP hide caption

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Ramzi El-Fekih, CEO of Creova, stands in his server room in Tunis. He has built a mobile payments company, but because of banking restrictions, Tunisians can use his product only for domestic purchases. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies
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A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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A woman casts her ballot Tuesday at a polling station in Nasr City, Cairo. Amru Salahuddien /Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Renee Montagne about the voting in Egypt
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Tunisians wave their national flag and shout slogans on Tuesday in the capital, Tunis, as they attend a rally marking the third anniversary of the uprising that ousted longtime dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Arab Spring Country Finally Getting It Right?
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Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi rallied outside the police academy in Cairo where his trial was opened, and quickly adjourned, on Monday. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-government demonstrators crowd Cairo's Tahrir Square in February 2011. A report from HSBC says Egypt and other Arab Spring countries will lose a total of $800 billion by the end of next year because of the unrest. Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tunisians are silhouetted Jan. 13 behind a poster of those who died in the revolution that overthrew an authoritarian president and started the Arab Spring. More than two years after the revolution, Tunisia is struggling with high unemployment and rising violence in its politics. Amine Landoulsi/AP hide caption

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Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak sits in the dock during a June 8 court hearing in Cairo. Amr Abdallah Dalsh /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A poster showing ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was hanging on barbed wire outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on Saturday. On the other side, guards stood watch. Khaled Elfiqi /EPA/Landov hide caption

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Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Wednesday. Shortly afterward, the military staged a coup, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution. Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jordanian protesters chant slogans against corruption during a March 15 anti-government demonstration in Amman. Jordanians have held Arab Spring-inspired protests since 2011, demanding political reforms and anti-corruption measures. The protests have been peaceful. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Rough Neighborhood, Jordan Clings To Its Stability
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Egyptian employees of the Cairo Opera House and opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi hold placards during a demonstration inside the opera's compound in Cairo on May 30, following the dismissal of the head of the opera house. The firing is the latest salvo in a cultural war between artists and the ruling Muslim Brotherhood. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carla del Ponte, a diplomat and prosecutor who now serves on the Independent International Commission of Inquiry for Syria. Salvatore Di Nolfi /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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A protester, and riot police in the background, during the clashes Friday in Tunis. Louafi Larbi /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley reporting from Tunis
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A Tunisian protester holds a baguette while taking to riot police in January 2011. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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On Friday and again on Saturday in Benghazi: Protesters took to the streets in opposition to the extremist militias that have operated in the city since the toppling of Moammar Gadhafi. Tariq Al-Hun /UPI /Landov hide caption

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Father Mina celebrates the Christmas Nativity Liturgy, the start of Christmas, at the Coptic Orthodox Church of St. George on Jan. 6 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Coptic churches around the country have witnessed a surge of Christians fleeing Egypt since the start of the Arab Spring. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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