Waad Qannam (left), 24, won a reality TV show called The President, in which the audience, instead of choosing its favorite singer, chose its favorite would-be leader. He is the closest Palestinians have come to electing a leader in more than a decade. Nick Schifrin/NPR hide caption

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He's Not The Palestinian President, But He Played One On TV

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Mourners carry the body of Palestinian Laith al-Khaldi during his funeral procession at the Jalazoun refugee camp, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on Aug. 1, 2015. An Israeli soldier shot Khaldi after he had been throwing rocks at a military post. This was during a relatively calm period, although almost two dozen Palestinians were killed during the first half of the year. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Even Calm Is Deadly

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The lingerie factory was opened in the West Bank in the 1980s in an attempt to develop the Palestinian economy. The factory was shut in 1990 amid bouts of West Bank violence and troubles with Israeli military regulations. Racks of robes and camisoles still hang in the production room. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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An Israeli-Palestinian Battle With Roots In Lingerie

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Israeli soldiers walk near a temporary checkpoint at the entrance of the Palestinian village of Yatta in the West Bank on Thursday after army forces entered the village in search of clues to Wednesday night's shootings in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv. Hazem Bader /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammad al-Hattab (left) and Samira Syam both teach driving at the al-Jarajwa school in Gaza City. Hattab was stopped by Hamas police, and his permit to teach temporarily revoked, for driving alone with a female student. Syam says nobody bothers her if she has a male student alone. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Hamas: Gaza Women Learning To Drive Must Have A Chaperone

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Avigdor Lieberman, who became Israel's new defense minister this week, visits Jerusalem's Old City on March 9. Lieberman's hard-line positions and controversial remarks have ignited fierce debate in Israel and beyond. Mahmoud Illean/AP hide caption

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Here's Why Israel's New Defense Minister Is So Controversial

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A mural on the wall of the boys' high school in Sair, a Palestinian town in the West Bank. More than a dozen young men from Sair were killed by Israeli forces since last fall, including during attacks on Israelis. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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A Fall In Knife Attacks On Israelis, Amid A Shifting Palestinian Mood

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Israeli Yosef Haim Ben-David (center), the ringleader in the killing of Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir in 2014, is escorted by Israeli policemen at the district court in Jerusalem on Tuesday. Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of Gaza City's Shujaya neighborhood shows this rebuilt home surrounded by others that were destroyed in 2014 and have not yet been reconstructed. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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In Gaza, A Few New, Shiny Homes Rise Amid The Rubble

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Arab-Israeli colleagues react to the departure of the last Palestinian SodaStream employees from the company's plant in the Israeli city of Rahat on Feb. 29. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When 500 Palestinians Lose Their Jobs At SodaStream, Who's To Blame?

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Bassam Aramin, 46, grew up hating Israel and spent seven years in an Israeli prison. But he gradually came to believe that negotiation, not violence, was the only way to resolve the conflict. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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A Palestinian Takes A Different Road In His Fight

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Palestinian activist Issa Amro advocates nonviolence in the West Bank city of Hebron. He recently talked a teenage girl out of an attack, but acknowledges it can be difficult to persuade young Palestinians to his position. In the background, Israeli soldiers patrol an olive tree grove next to his home, which the army has declared off-limits to non-residents. Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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In Hebron, A City Hit Hard By Violence, A Palestinian Preaches Nonviolence

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Known as the "numbers cemetery," this burial ground on an old military base in the off-limits zone close to Israel's border with Jordan holds the remains of some Palestinians. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Israel's Return Of Palestinian Bodies Is Fraught With Emotion And Politics

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